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The Museum will be open from 10 am–5 pm on Monday, September 5.
EXHIBITIONS

Currently on View

Self-Taught Genius: Treasures from the American Folk Art Museum
June 19–September 11

Impressions of War
August 5–February 12, 2017

Japanese Painting and Calligraphy: Highlights from the Collection
August 19–February 12, 2017

Upcoming Exhibitions

New Media Series: Dara Birnbaum
September 2–December 11

Textiles: Politics and Patriotism
September 9–March 5, 2017

Conflicts of Interest: Art and War in Modern Japan
October 16–January 8, 2017
LEARN & DO
Museum Calendar
Find out all about upcoming events on our event calendar.
Gallery Talks
This week’s free talks: Plains Indian Art and the Reservation Era. Meet in Sculpture Hall.
Family Sunday: Art Adventures
Each week in September, we’re going on an Art Adventure with free art activities, family tours, and Storytime in the galleries!
COLLECTIONS
The Saint Louis Art Museum has an encyclopedic collection of more than 33,000 works. Over 3,000 highlights of the collection are searchable online. This information changes weekly as objects are added, updated, and enhanced with current research.

The Saint Louis Art Museum recently accepted into its collection 225 works of art from the collection of the late C.C. Johnson Spink and Edith "Edie" Spink. Search the collection using the term "Spink."

Search The Collection

VISIT
Admission to the Museum is free every day.

Museum Hours


Tuesday–Sunday, 10 am–5 pm
Friday, 10 am–9 pm
Closed Monday
The Sculpture Garden is always open.

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The artistic voice of fiber artist Judith Scott
Though she lived her life without words, Judith Scott’s artistry was her communication and the works she left behind her inner voice.
Jean-Michel Basquiat’s Three Eighty Seven
Despite a brief career halted by his untimely death in 1988, Jean-Michel Basquiat was one of the most acclaimed American artists of the 1980s.
Dave Drake—from slave to American icon
He was a man bound by slavery, and with no formal training, he became a skilled and prolific potter whose work is now on view in Self-Taught Genius.